5 ways to fill dead space 

5 ways to fill dead space 

No matter whether it’s a bedroom, living room or kitchen. Just about any room in the home is susceptible to it, when it comes to laying a room out, preventing there being too much dead space is a top concern for any interior designer. 

Dead space— for those not in the know, refers to those awkward areas in a room that are just a bit too small or strangely shaped to be used as a passage way or to place  another piece of furniture to fill the gap. You know the types, you’ve got the sofa set in the room in that perfect spot aligned with the wall mounted TV, but now there’s a 30cm gap to its left, from the wall which just collects dust. 

Now, purists will say that you shouldn’t need to fill dead space, a well designed room should simply not have any. But the reality is, in many cases it’s unavoidable. Yes you could have bought a smaller table than the one you fell in love with, yes you could lay the room out differently — ‘but this layout gets the best morning light’. So, just what can you do to make do with this dead space? Here’s a few ideas…

 

Plants are friends 

So, let’s get the most obvious solution out of the way first — the humble potted plant, has been the option of choice to fill space that would otherwise not be utilised. Tall thin varieties such as dracaena are particularly good at filling these spaces. Not only are houseplants decorative but they have been proven to improve the atmosphere of the room they inhabit by improving the quality of the air. 

The most important thing to consider before you buy any houseplant is its specific care requirements, for example if the space you’re looking to fill is beside a radiator or bright window it’s not going to be a wise decision to opt for a plant that thrives in cool, dark environments. 

 

Make it light

Dead spaces, particularly in the kitchen or living room tend to also be shadowy dim areas that detract from the room’s overall aesthetic. It can be a good idea then to place some lighting there to brighten up the entire room. 

As lighting comes in such a diverse range you’ll be able to find something that fits. If not a floor or table lamp then consider going for sconce lighting. 

 

Fill it with art

Artworks and ornaments are another easy solution to fill dead space. Shop around for a statue, bust or sculpture you really love to fill the space. It may be  tempting, but avoid buying something you don’t like or aren’t ‘mad over’ purely because it would perfectly fill the gap in your living room. 

If you can’t find anything to fit in that awkward spot then look walls around it, putting up a painting, some pictures or a print you love is a great way to draw visual attention away from that awkward gap. 

 

Credit: Miafeur

Credit: Miafeur

Turn it into storage

Finally, if you cannot find any decorative way to utilise the dead space then you may at least be able to use it for a practical use. These awkward spaces can be transformed into handy little cubbies to hide things away when not in use. Even with an extremely narrow gap you should be able to find some kind of rack which could be used to hold magazines or blankets when not in use. 

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