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Cunning ways to use mirrors to improve a room’s appeal

Cunning ways to use mirrors to improve a room’s appeal

Despite having existed for thousands upon thousands of years, the humble mirror is still perhaps one of the most versatile and used tools we have. Requiring no charge or power supply, they’re used for a wide range of practices, from checking our appearance before heading to work, to checking on the traffic behind us when driving. There are few people who can truthfully say they don’t use some kind of mirror at least once a day. 

 When it comes to their place in the home, mirrors have more uses than just being a tool to make sure there’s no toothpaste residue around your mouth before heading out in the morning. They have a few interior design benefits to boot. Here’s just a few ways you can utilise mirrors and other reflective surfaces to improve just about any room in the home. 

 

Make it bigger 

Or at least seem bigger. The reflective qualities of a mirror serve to trick the mind somewhat into feeling that a space is much larger than it actually is. Anyone who has ever had their bathroom completely refitted will tell you that the space felt far smaller before all the mirrors were put in place. It’s not just glass mirrors that have this affect, to a lesser extent shiny surfaces such as stainless steel and polished stone also work to increase how big a room feels, which makes these materials an excellent choice for the worktops of kitchens that are on the petite side.

This trick works particularly well on pokey hallways and stairs that feel a little too narrow. Remember that the more mirrors you add the more the illusion is increased. 

 

Make it lighter 

Mirrors can also be used to bounce light around the room making it far brighter. This means that simply placing a mirror on the wall may be all you need to do to brighten up a particularly dim bedroom or living room. 

Don’t just think using a mirror will save you some money on artificial lighting either, a particularly clever way to use this trick is to place a mirror on the wall opposite a window, that way you can double the amount of natural light projected around the room during daylight hours. 

 

Image Credit: Melody Maison

Image Credit: Melody Maison

Draw the eye 

Few things can contend with a large mirror when it comes to drawing attention to a particular area of the room. Focal points are an important aspect of interior design. For example even when not in use, the large glass-black expanse of a wall-mounted television can easily become the first thing eyes are drawn to when entering the living room. By placing a similarly sized mirror on an alternate wall attention will be directed instead to this. 

Aside from forcing the eye away from other areas of the room, you can position a mirror near or above another design element of the room to accentuate it even further, the classic example of which is the mirror above the fireplace, but it also works well to highlight works of art or feature walls. 

 

Image Credit: Simas

Image Credit: Simas

Add some symmetry 

If you have the aesthetic tastes of Wes Anderson, and want to add as much symmetry to a room as possible then a mirror (or two obviously) is an incredibly useful tool. Position two identical mirrors in areas such as either side of a window or on the wall above your bedside cabinets. 

 

Bonus! Stick it outside 

Okay, it’s not technically a ‘room’ per se, but mirrors can also be used in garden or patio areas as well as internal parts of the home. Consider using a large, robust mirror to brighten up a gloomy basement patio or in a courtyard with such high walls that it doesn’t see to many rays past outside of midday. 

Now you’ve reflected on this why not improve your home with Opun? 

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