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How to clean your kitchen worktop 

How to clean your kitchen worktop 

Kitchen worktops aren’t just utilitarian objects for chopping ingredients placing our kitchen appliances on. They’re points of pride — marble, granite, laminate and wood. Whatever your kitchen worktop is made out of, you probably want to keep it looking its very best. But the trouble is, different materials require different care. What cleans one material may wreck another. 

Just what products and methods should you use to clean your worktop? Here’s what you need to know…

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Wood

Wood is a wonderful warm, long lasting and natural material that if properly looked after can last for generations. Since it’s an organic material we think it’s best to eschew artificial chemicals all together and keep it clean with a homemade, environmentally friendly compound.

Mix together some white vinegar, warm water and tablespoon of washing up liquid in a spray bottle. Use this solution daily on your wooden worktops after use to keep them looking in tip top condition and to kill any germs. To remove more stubborn stains cover with a sprinkling of salt, then lemon juice and rub with the rough side of a sponge.

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Laminate and solid surface

Laminate is among the easiest of worktop materials to clean, it’s artificial nonporous nature means that few things can harm it. That being said, there’s no need to go over the top. You don’t need to use a heavy bleach or anything remotely simmilar. Just use a very mild shop-bought antibacterial spray. Avoid using coarse sponges as these could scratch the surface, a microfibre cloth is perfect. 

 

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Cultured Marble and Quartz

Quartz and cultured marble are bound in a tough resin that makes it pretty impervious to most types of damage. You can easily clean these materials with nothing more than washing up liquid, hot water and a microfibre cloth.

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Concrete

Providing your concrete worktop has been sealed you can clean it in much the same way as laminate. Just use a PH-neutral cleaner, warm water and a cloth, if you live in a hard water area then filter the water first to avoid depositing limescale on the surface. 

 

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Marble and Granite 

Once again, washing up liquid and water is fine for everyday cleaning. Marble and granite can on occasion stain, and washing up liquid will not be tough enough to handle this. For an oil based stain make a paste from baking soda and leave it over night (although the longer the better) to tackle it. 

More stubborn stains can be cleaned from granite using hydrogen peroxide. You can pick up big bottles of 12% food grade hydrogen peroxide for as little as £2 a bottle that will last you a long while. Apply it to a clean cloth and wipe the surface clean. You can also mix it with flour and water to create a paste that should take off the stubbornest of stains after being left on for 12 hours. Note, you should do a spot check before using these chemicals on your worktop to ensure it does not discolour or affect the finish. 

 

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Stainless steel and glass

Cleaning stainless steel and glass worktops to a shiny streak-free finish can seem like an ordeal, but it can be done relatively quickly with no need to purchase those expensive material-specific cleaners. First wipe down with every day washing up liquid (once again), then give it a gentle scrub with a nylon bristled brush and a tiny amount of vinegar. Then just dry and buff with a clean cloth to get that perfect shine. 

Alternative Thinking

So there you have it, whatever material your worktop is made out of, there’s a cheap alternative out there to the somewhat expensive material specific cleaners you find in the supermarkets, which in many cases are also better for the environment.

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